Thursday, November 27, 2014

How To Thaw A Turkey Fast And Safely

Thanksgiving Turkey
Photo Credit: USDA

There are three ways to thaw your turkey safely — in the refrigerator, in cold water, or in the microwave oven.  But now that it is Thanksgiving Day, only two of those options remain to thaw your Thanksgiving turkey fast and safely with just hours to go before dinner.


Food safety is especially important as you prepare for Thanksgiving dinner. The U.S. Center for Disease Control is a food safety partner with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), which is responsible for the safety of meat and poultry.  FSIS has assembled preparation tips intended to serve as safety reminders.


Turkeys must be kept at a safe temperature during "the big thaw."  While frozen, a turkey is safe indefinitely.  However, as soon as it begins to thaw, any bacteria that may have been present before freezing can begin to grow again. 



turkey should never be thawed on the counter or in hot water. These methods are NOT considered safe and may lead to foodborne illness. Also, never thaw a turkey in a garage, basement, car, on the kitchen counter, outdoors or on the porch. Turkey, as any perishable food, must be kept at a safe temperature during “the big thaw.” If not, once the turkey begins to thaw and becomes warmer than 40 °F, bacteria present before freezing can begin to multiply.
Even though the center of the bird may still be frozen as it thaws on the counter, the outer layer of the turkey could be in the “Danger Zone,” between 40 and 140 °F — temperatures where bacteria multiply rapidly.
- See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/11/19/the-big-thaw-for-thanksgiving/#more-48624
A turkey should never be thawed on the counter or in hot water. These methods are NOT considered safe and may lead to foodborne illness. Also, never thaw a turkey in a garage, basement, car, on the kitchen counter, outdoors or on the porch. Turkey, as any perishable food, must be kept at a safe temperature during “the big thaw.” If not, once the turkey begins to thaw and becomes warmer than 40 °F, bacteria present before freezing can begin to multiply.



Even though the center of the bird may still be frozen as it thaws on the counter, the outer layer of the turkey could be in the “Danger Zone,” between 40 and 140 °F — temperatures where bacteria multiply rapidly.

urkey should never be thawed on the counter or in hot water. These methods are NOT considered safe and may lead to foodborne illness. Also, never thaw a turkey in a garage, basement, car, on the kitchen counter, outdoors or on the porch. Turkey, as any perishable food, must be kept at a safe temperature during “the big thaw.” If not, once the turkey begins to thaw and becomes warmer than 40 °F, bacteria present before freezing can begin to multiply.
Even though the center of the bird may still be frozen as it thaws on the counter, the outer layer of the turkey could be in the “Danger Zone,” between 40 and 140 °F — temperatures where bacteria multiply rapidly.
- See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/11/19/the-big-thaw-for-thanksgiving/#more-48624
turkey should never be thawed on the counter or in hot water. These methods are NOT considered safe and may lead to foodborne illness. Also, never thaw a turkey in a garage, basement, car, on the kitchen counter, outdoors or on the porch. Turkey, as any perishable food, must be kept at a safe temperature during “the big thaw.” If not, once the turkey begins to thaw and becomes warmer than 40 °F, bacteria present before freezing can begin to multiply.
Even though the center of the bird may still be frozen as it thaws on the counter, the outer layer of the turkey could be in the “Danger Zone,” between 40 and 140 °F — temperatures where bacteria multiply rapidly.
- See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/11/19/the-big-thaw-for-thanksgiving/#more-48624
turkey should never be thawed on the counter or in hot water. These methods are NOT considered safe and may lead to foodborne illness. Also, never thaw a turkey in a garage, basement, car, on the kitchen counter, outdoors or on the porch. Turkey, as any perishable food, must be kept at a safe temperature during “the big thaw.” If not, once the turkey begins to thaw and becomes warmer than 40 °F, bacteria present before freezing can begin to multiply.
Even though the center of the bird may still be frozen as it thaws on the counter, the outer layer of the turkey could be in the “Danger Zone,” between 40 and 140 °F — temperatures where bacteria multiply rapidly.
- See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/11/19/the-big-thaw-for-thanksgiving/#more-48624



A package of frozen meat or poultry left thawing on the counter more than 2 hours is not at a safe temperature.  Even though the center of the package may still be frozen, the outer layer of the food is in the "Danger Zone" between 40 and 140 °F — at a temperature where foodborne bacteria multiply rapidly. 


How to thaw a turkey in water:
 

In Cold Water
Allow approximately 30 minutes per pound
4 to 12 pounds 2 to 6 hours
12 to 16 pounds 6 to 8 hours
16 to 20 pounds 8 to 10 hours
20 to 24 pounds 10 to 12 hours


Wrap your turkey securely, making sure the water is not able to leak through the wrapping. Submerge your wrapped turkey in cold tap water. Change the water every 30 minutes. Cook the turkey immediately after it is thawed. Do not refreeze. 




How to thaw a turkey in a microwave oven:


  • Check your owner's manual for the size turkey that will fit in your microwave oven, the minutes per pound and power level to use for thawing.
  • Remove all outside wrapping.
  • Place on a microwave-safe dish to catch any juices that may leak.
  • Cook your turkey immediately. Do not refreeze or refrigerate your turkey after thawing in the microwave oven.


REMINDER: Remove the giblets from the turkey cavities after thawing. Cook separately.