Friday, September 28, 2012

Publix Recalls Hearts of Romaine Lettuce For Listeria

Publix Supermarkets is issuing a voluntary recall for 10 ounce plastic bags of Publix Hearts of Romaine (Chopped Hearts of Romaine) due to the fact that they may be adulterated with Lysteria monocytogenes. Ready Pac is the private supplier of the private label product for the company. The UPC found on the back right hand corner of the package is 41415 03886.


Publix recieved notification of the contmination from the US Food and Drug Administration after a routine sample collection. Product was distributed to Publix stores between September 8,2012 through September 20, 2012 in select Florida counties, Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama, and Tennessee. The following Florida Counties are affected by the recall: Alachua, Baldwin, Bay, Beaufort, Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Clay, Coffee, Columbia, Dougherty, Duval, Escambia, Flagler, Glynn, Houston, Jasper, Lee, Leon, Lowndis, Marion, Nassau, Okaloosa, Putnam, Santa Rosa, St. Johns, Suwannee, Thomas, Tift, Volusia and Walton.


"While the product is no longer available on store shelves we have issued a voluntary recall because of out commitment to food safety and to advise our customers who may still have this product at home," said Maria Borus, Publix media and community relations director. "No illnesses have been reported up to date in connection withthe hearts of romaine. Consumers who have purchased the products in question may return the product to their local store for a full refund. Publix customers with additional questions may call out Customer Care Center at 1-800-242-1227 or by visit our websites at www.publix.com. Customers can also contact the US Food and Drug Administration at 1-888-SAFEFOOD (1-800-723-3366)."

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Clinical Features/Signs and Symptoms

Listeriosis is a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. The disease primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, pregnant women, and newborns.  Rarely, persons without these risk factors can also be affected.

A person with listeriosis usually has fever and muscle aches, often preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. Almost everyone who is diagnosed with listeriosis has invasive infection (meaning that the bacteria spread from their intestines to their blood stream or other body sites).

Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the high-risk category, including older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women, who experience flu-like symptoms within 2 months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the physician or health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

The symptoms vary with the infected person:
  • High-risk persons other than pregnant women: Symptoms can include fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, and convulsions.
  • Pregnant women: Pregnant women typically experience only a mild, flu-like illness. However, infections during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery, or life-threatening infection of the newborn.
  • Previously healthy persons: People who were previously healthy but were exposed to a very large dose of Listeria can develop a non-invasive illness (meaning that the bacteria have not spread into their blood stream or other body sites). Symptoms can include diarrhea and fever.
If a person has eaten food contaminated with Listeria and does not have any symptoms, most experts believe that no tests or treatment are needed, even for persons at high risk for listeriosis.